It’s a never ending subject of curiosity why debates go down different roads on different social networks. Such an example happened this week when Kiana Mickels posted a review on Resident Advisor of Beyoncé Knowles’s new album “Renaissance” – the variety of reactions couldn’t have been more stark.

Now, our opinion of the Mickels review is that she uses far too many words to say very little. Then again, when Resident Advisor’s own editor-in-chief does exactly the same thing, we don’t expect much else. The review is long-winded and a tad pompous – but it does make legitimate points and is a valid point of view.

The reactions across the socials couldn’t have been more different. In Mark Zuckerberg land, the main criticism on Facebook appeared to be that Resident Advisor were yet again posting on the subject of Beyoncé Knowles – with many pointed digs referencing the £750,000 bailout the site received two years ago.

But on Twitter? The mob soon descended, and things got ugly. So ugly that Mickels had to put her own account on lockdown. Whilst people were obviously entitled to disagree with her viewpoint and her points about what she called “ballroom culture”, quite a few appeared to think their legitimate criticism had to be coupled with attacks on her appearance.

This all reminds us of the disgusting meme that Carl Craig and Alexander Omar Smith shared about journalist Annabel Ross. Despite her previous attacks on this site, Ears To The House was the first to defend Ross against this onslaught of abuse – something which the people who had hired her for the job of reviewing Movement at Detroit failed abysmally to do.

And guess what? The hopeless dance music press has managed to mess up its response again. Where is Resident Advisor’s article defending their writer and condemning the abuse she has suffered? Where is the sense of loyalty towards one of their own? Shamefully, even Annabel Ross has failed to come to the rescue of one of her own, even after her own experience.

For what it’s worth, our review was written from the perspective of people who were listening to the album. In other words, did we like what we were hearing? Ears To The House isn’t going to talk about things like what Knowles was contributing to queer culture through the album or such – others are better qualified to do so and we also suspect most listeners casually streaming it aren’t too interested in the question…