On Friday, the dance music press got terribly excited by the fact Drake had released a new album. This was an excuse to write clickbait articles telling the world how brilliant the album was, despite almost certainly not having listened to any of it – the only focus for most journalists working on a Friday is getting all their jobs done before the weekend.

But the dance press got especially excited and played strongly on the claim there’s lots of “house music” on the album, called Honestly, Nevermind. This was immediately something which got our backs up at Ears To The House HQ – whenever the majors get involved with house music these days, it rarely ends well.

In the interests of fairness, we tasked ourselves yesterday to listen the entire album in one whole go – what better way to get a sense of what it’s all about than by spending our Saturday afternoon doing this? After we managed to wake up those who fell asleep out of boredom during the task, we had a discussion about the album.

The unanimous consensus is that, basically, we thought it was crap. Most of the records on the album sounded very samey for our tastes, the vocals are largely in one tone, there’s little to no variety in the arrangements – in short, it’s awful. But even worse are the attempts to classify this as a house music album.

Ears To The House firmly believes that house music is going to need new ideas and new innovations to push it forward into the future. There’s no denying that areas of the genre are starting to show their age – that’s hardly surprising when it’s been around for almost 40 years. But this simply isn’t it – it feels like hip-hop and autotune rap have simply borrowed elements from house rather than openly embraced it.

The likes of Black Coffee and Rampa are involved, yes, but this really shouldn’t fool anyone. Nonetheless, do expect to hear this everywhere for a while – the incredibly sparse production values mean it’s ripe for DJs to create their own edits and remixes. We only wonder just how strictly Republic will guard their copyright…