Ears To The House has a few corrections to make to this article. UBQ Project was established in 1990, not 1991, and Ron Trent was only involved with their first release – Smith and Hunter did everything afterwards as a duo. Also, the final UBQ release was in 1998 – not 1996, as originally claimed. Apologies for the errors. Update as of 7pm on 4th July 2022.

Since Drake and Beyoncé Knowles released new records recently with a more housey kind of sound, opinion has been divided. Ears To The House has made its disdain for their efforts clear – we believe Drake’s album was terrible, and that Beyoncé Knowles should have been able to create something far more exciting than the final product.

In a sign that someone in the Knowles camp might be feeling rattled by recent criticism of the song, we understand that Columbia Records have commissioned a number of remixes. How many of these will see the light of day coming out of the mysterious world of major labels is, of course, anyone’s guess – but it looks like at least one of them will.

Over the weekend, Terry Hunter used his set at the Chosen Few festival in Chicago to premiere his remix of “Break My Soul” – and judging by the video courtesy of Rolling Out, it received a pretty positive reception. And when you’ve got a crowd which really knows their house music and know what they like, Hunter could be onto something…

So what’s our verdict here at Ears To The House HQ? Well, Hunter’s remix clearly draws from his past experiences. Between 1990 and 1998, Hunter was part of house music production duo UBQ Project with Aaron Smith – although Ron Trent was also involved with their first release. The three men released tracks like “Now I Know I Love You” with Terence FM, but were primarily known for their remixes for the likes of Brownstone, Masters At Work, Georgie Porgie, Zhane and Mary J Blige.

We like the fact it takes some inspiration from the 1990s, yet doesn’t stick slavishly to that era – there are, it appears, some influences from Hunter’s more recent work in there too. But most mercifully of all, there isn’t a single plastic sounding M1 piano in sight on this version.

At this rate, we might just have to take back any words we’ve said about cashing in…