Isn’t that just typical? We at Ears To The House take our traditional Saturday off – although that’s one tradition we’ll be disposing of once we’re good and ready – and something like this happens. A man who claimed to be Derrick Carter’s tour manager managed to obtain four passes to Chicago’s ARC Festival.

These tickets are selling for some seriously big money online – tickets for VIP Plus sell for $999. The festival finishes today – but there’s one detail in the story which we haven’t told you yet. You see, Derrick Carter does not have a tour manager – in other words, someone blagged themselves a four-figure sum worth of passes by pretending to be someone that doesn’t actually exist.

And Carter wasted no time telling the world he wasn’t happy about it…

Most of those commenting share Carter’s displeasure at his name being used to effectively steal four passes, and pondered how exactly this could have happened. Possibilities include the con artist being very persuasive and a member of staff not doing their job properly are just two of the ones we can safely list here.

One particular dissenter, however, wonders what all the fuss is about. He said “DJs, promoters, and old school partiers who all got their start participating in illegal warehouse parties, not paying taxes, selling contraband to make rent are all clutching their pearls over someone getting away with a few wristbands from a multimillion dollar festival? I hope the kid gets away with it.”.

Citing examples of the scene being founded on illegality, he refers to the massive illegal raves which took place in the UK in the 1980s – and crackdowns by Mayor Richard M Daley in Chicago in the early 2000s. Curiously, Ears To The House finds ourselves conflicted at this point – something which a number of those commenting also did.

Whilst what’s happened here is clearly wrong and Carter has every right to be annoyed about his name being used, we can’t disagree with any of the logic or facts expressed. If it wasn’t for the fact people were prepared to break the law years ago, would we be talking about house music right now? Probably not…