Think of the long running Global Underground series and names like Tony De Vit, John Digweed, Deep Dish, Carl Cox and Danny Tenaglia come to mind. As part of the series, they released mixes which are still fondly remembered today. And it turns out Global Underground is still a thing.

Admittedly, this was something of a surprise to us at Ears To The House – the output of the series has become incredibly patchy in recent years. Now, it doesn’t take a genius to work out the sound of house music changes over time – and whilst all but one of the above named DJs are still around in the scene, they’ve had their turn at Global Underground. Where would they go to represent the sound of today instead?

Step forward, Amelie Lens. They’ve announced she’s compiling and mixing the next edition of the series, which will be available from November. Methods of purchase involve an MP3 download from £9.99, rising all the way to £75 for a so-called collector’s edition. And yet the internet is already angry.

Let’s cast aside, for a moment, the inevitable depressing misogyny from certain quarters over a woman being allowed anywhere Global Underground. Let’s ignore the fact Global Underground is a privately owned entity and can choose whoever they wish to represent them and their brand.

Let’s even put aside questions over whether Lens is even a good DJ – from what we read online and hear from our sources, this is a question which causes some division. Put all that stuff to the side for a minute to remember one central fact.

And that central fact is this – none of the people criticising the mix will actually have heard it yet. For all we know, Lens could have appreciated the status of Global Underground amongst their own community and put in two mixes filled with energy and smooth transitions between records. It’s also possible she might have messed up every single mix and chosen dreadful tracks – but right now, nobody knows.

Ears To The House has no issue criticising DJ mixes when they mess up. Higher echelon DJs like Amelie Lens are paid substantial amounts of money for each gig – those booking her as well as those paying to see her are entitled to judge her mixing skills. The same goes for all DJs in that situation.

But when a DJ set is being criticised before anyone has even heard it? We have a problem with that – and we would wonder what the real issue is…