Yesterday, Ears To The House published a brief article all about Derrick May’s biography on his own site. We had some feedback from it, pointing to a few other things which weren’t included in the poorly written puff piece – so let’s cover one or two more things right now.

Firstly, we notice the site seems to be unavailable once more. It disappeared just hours after our article appeared – and the Detroit techno world would seriously have you believe they don’t read this site! Perhaps a charitable explanation is that May (or should that be long-time sycophant Michael Weston?) has taken the website online to update the biography with new information.

In which case, they need not resort to such drastic measures. The WordPress app allows you to update a page very quickly – you load it up in an editor, add those pesky multiple allegations of sexual abuse you were hoping you wouldn’t have to mention and then click the ‘update’ button. It’s a pretty easy process – feel free to email us if you’d like more tips, Mr May.

In the meantime, here’s something else which wasn’t mentioned. Two words – Michael James. If it wasn’t for an eight minute instrumental by James, “Strings Of Life” wouldn’t exist. The song is based on a sample from the Michael James song – and even May himself admits the track did wonders for his career.

It must be difficult for Derrick May to accept that he potentially owes his career to the man who first revealed allegations of sexual abuse and impropriety against him – and yet it’s a truth. Like so many things with the so-called Belleville Three, the real story is much more interesting than the heavily sanitised and filtered propaganda they’ve put out for decades.

Elsewhere, May pretty much stopped making music entirely in 1992. There’s no explanation here for why, nor how this correlates with him being an innovator. Thomas Edison didn’t stop inventing things after a few things went on to do good things – he continued to invent throughout his life. Why did Derrick May stop in 1992 and barely do anything in the studio since?

Perhaps there’s a good explanation for it – this biography would be the perfect place to do so, all using his own words. He could also elaborate on why he used to do at least 200 shows per year yet now barely does a trickle. In your own time, Derrick…