So the inevitable has finally happened. Those of you familiar with British politics will know that Boris Johnson and corruption are two very cosy bedfellows. The consensus at Ears To The House is this man – a principle-free liar and cheat – should never have been allowed anywhere near Downing Street.

Last week, it emerged a man called Chris Pincher resigned as a government whip after groping the arses of two men whilst steaming drunk at a party. It soon emerged numerous claims had been made about Pincher dating back many years – so what did Johnson do in response?

The same as he always does in life when things get difficult – send out government ministers to defend him on the basis of lies they’d been told themselves. On Tuesday, he finally admitted he knew about the allegations – cue a subsequent of over 50 ministers in his government resigning over less than 48 hours.

When added to everything else – parties in lockdown, allegations that he and then girlfriend Carrie Symonds were caught doing something very unparliamentary in his office in 2018, the endless stream of lies on everything else, the failure to do anything about the cost of living – we’re just surprised he wasn’t gone already. At lunchtime today, he finally announced he was leaving as soon as the Tories work out which intellectual pygmy they want to replace him.

So what was the big difference in this scandal? Well, this was about sexual harassment – in an age where this is a big topic, lying about this was always going to prove toxic. And whilst we’re glad Boris Johnson’s time as Prime Minister is coming to an end, we do worry the list of candidates for his replacement is unlikely to inspire much confidence.

But why are we writing about this? Aren’t we a dance music site, after all? Yes, we certainly are – but we thought we’d make a comparison with the dance music world. And on this occasion, the political world has done a rare thing – it has taught the dance music world a thing or two.

When the dance music world found out about the numerous allegations surrounding Derrick May, how did they respond? Sure, a lot of people have stopped booking him – but isn’t there much more that can be done? Or take the rape allegation against Erick Morillo in August 2020 – when he died a few weeks later of a ketamine overdose, how did the big names in dance music answer?

By publishing gushing, nauseating eulogies about how much of a “legend” he supposedly was. And when confronted about it, most deleted their tributes and pretended it never happened – an unworthy response. The only notable exceptions who admitted they’d got things wrong were Defected boss Simon Dunmore and Jamie Jones.

So whilst the likes of Mixmag are posting clickbait articles with YouTube links to “celebrate” the news, those of us in the real world might want to ponder over whether the dance music world is taking sexual harassment, assault and the rest as seriously as it should…